Category: A Little Philosophy

A Little Philosophy: Usefulness of short practice periods

Repetition is used to train the body and mind to freely express selected activities.

If we love what we do, however, but stop practicing, how long will the expertise we acquire last?

Apparently, our skills weaken over a period proportionate to the amount of time it took to learn them. Different skills, of course, have different rates of decay.

The good news is that once an established skill is dropped, it can be reactivated quickly without the same amount of initial struggle. But why let a beloved skill just slip away?

Keeping a skill active is different than continuing the intensity of practice and repetition when striving for ever higher achievement. Serious study takes preparation and motivation. Continuously using a skill, however, keeps it fresh.

If you are still physically healthy and don’t want to have conversations started by saying “I once was . . .”, you’ll find it easy to remain successful.

The key to maintaining your expertise is to use your skill daily. While formalized sessions are valuable no matter how much time you devote to them, the critical activity is to just “do it.”

Examples:

Were you once good at basketball? Then take a few minutes when you come home from work to shoot hoops, rather than rely on bi-weekly games at the gym.

Could you once sketch proficiently? Then commit to creating at least one drawing daily, rather than counting on big weekend adventures or vacations to practice your art.

Love playing an instrument? Playing it daily will keep you in tune, while just playing at an occasional party might result in an embarrassing, error-filled situation.

There are many articles about how to practice, with specific advice on organization and attitude. The most important advice to the exclusion of everything else, however, is to simply “do it daily.”

Link

 


Article by Karen Little, first published for Littleviews.com on August 14, 2019. You can publish this article in a non-commercial site with permission from Karen.

Questions? Ask Karen at info@littleviews.com. Do you have an article you’d like to see in this series? Karen would love to hear from you.

A Little Philosophy: Familiarity breeds success

Would you buy a car if you knew that a third of them were bad? Or that 43% of the cars you bought at a local lot were not drive-able?

The above information about failure rates are similar to the type of failures reported in the article 23 College Dropout Statistics That Will Surprise You.

Educational services have documented failure rates that are not tolerated in any other profession or service. Can you imagine if the medical establishment regarded failure as normal?

Many colleges blame student failure on money issues (they take the money, while the students have the problems), but the biggest reason why students can’t relate to classes is because they lack familiarization with class contents.

Students lack foundation knowledge beyond “reading and writing” and schools know this. Yet, schools willingly accept tuition money knowing that a sizable number of wannabee learners will not succeed.

With planning, however, you (and your kids) can succeed. To do this, familiarize yourself with subjects you are about to take before you start taking them.

Here’s an example on how to familiarize yourself with course work, referencing the freshman English syllabus at Rutgers University:

English skills are defined as “basic writing and reading strategies.”

Using Google, search on variations of that description, such as on “video tutorials on basic writing and reading strategies” and “self-tests on basic writing and reading.”

Use the articles, videos, images, and podcasts you find to familiarize yourself with what you need to know before you need to know it.

To receive an education is to add to what we already know, not start from absolute scratch before beginning on an important (and expensive) endeavor.

One solution that would lift the graduation success rate is to require students to familiarize themselves with courses before paying tuition and starting class.

Until that happens, a reliable solution is to familiarize ourselves with subjects via the Internet. Once informed, then begin formal education knowing that success, and not the high probability of failure, will almost be assured.

For more information, perform Internet searches on “pre-class training.”

Links

Abstract: Course directors often note that medical science classes struggle with beginning medical courses when the material introduces novel concepts and terminology or requires recall of previously learned material. Pre-class quizzes induce students to review past courses and pre-read before the class is initiated, fostering easier entry into the subject matter.

 


Article by Karen Little, first published for Littleviews.com on August 13, 2019. You can publish this article in a non-commercial site with permission from Karen.

Questions? Ask Karen at info@littleviews.com. Do you have an article you’d like to see in this series? Karen would love to hear from you.

A Little Philosophy: Invigorate creativity with more oxygen

Many people believe that they’ve lost their creativity and youthfulness because they feel tired and sluggish all day long.

That impairment is often caused, however, by our body’s lack of motion and related oxygen restriction.

Note that when we breath, our brains use almost three times more oxygen than muscles. Just the slightest decrease in oxygen triggers sluggishness, depression, and if decreased enough, it can make lasting cognitive damage.

Deep breathing does not correct this situation. This is because deep breathing removes the carbon dioxide (C02) from our cells, thereby reducing the oxygen carried through our blood, rather than increasing it.

The easiest way to correct the situation is to move regularly and monitor our heart rate throughout the day to prove to ourselves we are actually taking in oxygen more efficiently.

If you find yourself sitting excessively, the following tips are helpful:

  • Take frequent short walks, maybe once an hour for five minutes each
  • Use a timer to remind you to stand up and move around
  • Wear an inexpensive heart-rate monitor watch so you can check your heart rate against your behavior.
  • Wear a pedometer (many of which are combined with heart-rate monitors), to remind you of your walking distance

For $31 on Amazon Prime, you can buy an inexpensive Lintelek Fitness Tracker, which is a heart-monitor loved by almost 2,000 reviewers. As a bonus, it is also a pedometer, plus has alarms to prod you to get up and about.

Other brands are available, of course, with many at significantly higher prices. Buying any one of these, however, and paying attention to what it tells you can significantly re-energize you through prodding.

Links

 


Article by Karen Little, first published for Littleviews.com on August 11, 2019. You can publish this article in a non-commercial site with permission from Karen.

Questions? Ask Karen at info@littleviews.com. Do you have an article you’d like to see in this series? Karen would love to hear from you.

 

 

A Little Philosophy: Make yourself found

While it is easy to find people and groups who have similar interests, it takes more work to have people find you.

I once had a friend who wore the same bright, brimmed hat everywhere, whether such an accessory was actually needed. Why? She did this because she wanted people to not only notice her, but to make no mistake about who she was.

While the majority of us have nothing to sell, it is nice to meet people with whom we can share conversations. One way to attract such people is to be “found.”

Obviously, attending groups and special interest events will help us meet others. If, however, we strive to blend in, it becomes highly probable that we won’t be seen (or recognized) at all.

A key to becoming “found” is to make ourselves physically noticeable. Attend events wearing defining pieces, such as a hat, scarf, or jacket. Online, present yourself with a clear selfie, or use a single original illustration or emoji only you have. (That’s me on the right.)

Also pay attention to what others want to know. Be forthcoming in answering questions as well as showing that you are appreciative of what others are saying.

Keep your conversation current, or research what others are saying so when you do join conversations, you’ll feel at ease and others will feel at ease with you.

Even more important, keep track of people’s names, whether on- or off-line, and note their viewpoints.

Becoming found must be followed by becoming remembered. Here us a recap plus a few more points on how you can achieve both.

  • Regularly wear the same (or very similar) distinctive piece, such as a hat, vest, scarf, etc.
  • When attending an event, make sure to wear a bright pop of color
  • If appropriate and you are a big fan, wear team accessories
  • If possible, have your hair professionally styled, and stick with the style
  • Carry a distinctive accessory, such as hand- or carrier-bag
  • Give out uniquely designed contact cards
  • For online profiles, use a sharp  photo of yourself that features a bright color. In the example below, the bright golden yellow might be more graphically memorable than my face.

  • If you do not want to picture yourself, have a unique illustration developed for use in all of your profiles. Want an animal profile? Contact me with $50, and I’ll make it happen!

 


Article by Karen Little, first published for Littleviews.com on August 9, 2019. You can publish this article in a non-commercial site with permission from Karen.

Questions? Ask Karen at info@littleviews.com. Do you have an article you’d like to see in this series? Karen would love to hear from you.